Gideon Masters

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Growing pains

Good Books which deal with growing pains are actually quite rare, I think. But here are a few which have had an impact on me:

Leslie Tate – Heaven’s Rage
Louisa May Alcott – Little Women

There are a few more lighter reads such as:
And I would even go so far as to add Enid Blyton’s Famous Five and Secret Seven to this list.
Beatrice Holloway‘s tales about Rhys and life on a canal boat would also fit this bill.

Both Percy’s Quest by Barbara Follows
and the George and Flora series by Rachel Haywood deal with growing up issues through the lives of animals.

Growing up of a different kind is tackled in Illumination by Mavis Patcher. This is a story of two androids learning how to be human.
Gideon Master’s characters in his Lucifer’s Child trilogy (not recommended for anyone under 18 years old) have to learn to deal with new worlds and states of being.

first published 8 May 2017, updated 2024

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Gideon Masters appreciation

Gideon Masters

It’s really difficult to write about someone who uses a pseudonym to maintain anonymity rather than distinguish between their writing personas (John Samson/RJ Whitfield; Robbie/Roberta Eaton Cheadle). However, as this is a focus on writing, it’s fairly easy. Gideon Masters has written books I would not have read had I not been the publisher.
Known as the Lucifer’s Child trilogy, the three books, Lucifer’s Child, Ovum and Gestation tell of a struggle for the world and mind of humanity. It was once described to me as esoteric dystopia.
Essentially a tale of survival and good vs bad, Gideon brings together various religious perspectives, teasing out aspects of different beliefs and religious practices. Discussing these over a cup of coffee with Gideon, and subsequently restoring some order to life is always a pleasure.
Understanding the background enabled me to remain relatively objective; very necessary given the graphic (but not gratuitous) descriptions especially in Lucifer’s Child which is the most vivid and brutal.
Over coffee, we’ve explored ways to promote Lucifer’s Child but short of creating a whole other human persona to market the books, the task will remain more difficult.
While I’ve valued, and value, our coffee chats touching on themes in Lucifer’s Child, Ovum and Gestation, the books themselves are worth a read to see how Gideon unravels two, if not more, parallel and intersecting worlds. The interplay and movement between worlds fascinates me as does the alternating personas: There’s no shortage of either in this trilogy.
For someone, like me, who is firmly rooted in past reality, my mind boggles and somersaults at Gideon’s imagination and creativity, even more so when I know he was taken over by the story (as some authors are) rather than being the crafter.

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Horripilation

A few books in the TSL collection give me horripilations:
The Good Vicar by RJ Whitfield, and especially
the Lucifer’s Child trilogy by Gideon Masters
And I really didn’t expect to find the word on a medical page!

If you’ve resisted following the links until now, horripilation is what goosebumps are called.

Amna Agib in The roots that gave birth to magical blossoms could have used horripilations when reference is made to the pleasant sensations felt in some of the stories. However, I don’t think the word would have flowed off the tongue or the stories carried the same weight had horripilation been used in place of her descriptions.

And it turns out the word is used in music too – a music genre.

One lives and learns.

first published 4 March 2018, updated 2024

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Reconciliation

If one wanted to identify a theme in the books I enjoy, it will most likely be Reconciliation. People finding ways to put aside their differences and come to a closer understanding of each other. It’s a theme dominant in TSL author John Samson’s work: Powerless and Shaka Are Dead (don’t forget The Good Vicar).

Some other books I’ve enjoyed and others I will look to read include:

Harper Lee – To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman

Antonia Hayes – Relativity

Various other books by TSL authors have elements of reconciliation: Death on the Vine by Linda Kane and Gestation by Gideon Masters.

first published 14 May 2017, updated 2024

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Mermaids #books #readingforpleasure

Mermaids are magical. And spurred on by some book titles which flittered across my social media channels thought I’d share the TSL books which mention mermaids.

To start, a mermaid to lure you into Warm and Wet by Philip Philmar
Army of Angels in Sai-Ko by Gabriela Harding
Lucifer’s Child by Gideon Masters
The Dream Speaks Back by Sue Hampton, Leslie Tate and Cy Henty
Family are the Friends you Choose by Marthe Kiley-Worthington
The Ballad of Crookback and Shakespeare by Clive Greenwood and Jason Wing
Ravelled by Sue Hampton
And the Mermaid Theatre, London features in Big Name Hunting by Arnie Wilson

And the books which influenced this post:
The Mermaid of Black Conch by Monique Roffey (thanks to St Ives Bookshop which supports The Green Man and the Raven’s Quest)
The Girl from the Sea by Molly Knox Osterley

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Priests and Religious men

Priests and Religious men

Religion in the UK is apparently on the decline yet it features in a few novels – in fact a surprising number.
For example in novels authored by TSL writers, we have:

Most well-known in British literature:
Father Brown by GK Chesterton
and the Irish-based sitcom Father Ted
The Thornbirds by Colleen McCullough
all of which
feature Roman Catholic priests.

Some factual church histories include:

 

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Time travel

I can’t say time-travel is one of my favourite things although I do sometimes think it would be wonderful to ‘beam me up, Scottie’ to get to another country rather than go through all the hassle of airports and sitting on a plane for many hours. Recently, I’ve had a few encounters with time travel in novels. What seems to be trend for time-travellers is that their clothes are behind the times and the give-away.

In The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, Henry keeps arriving in new time zones naked. The reason given for this is so that his clothes do not give him away. He needs to find attire for the time he’s visiting.

Nick Horgan has Memories of Time Travel in his collection of short stories by that name, while in The Land of Counterpane, Tricia Price takes young readers back in time with some historical fiction, similarly young Christopher Crown travels back in time to join Nelson’s navy.
Other TSL authors who deal with changes in time and space are John Samson in Reading Lady Chatterley in Africa and The Fall of the Romance Empire, Gideon Masters in the Lucifer’s Child trilogy, Robbie Cheadle in Through the Nethergate and Beatrice Holloway in Elusive Destiny.

first published 12 January 2017, updated 2024