Beatrice Holloway

0

Beatrice Holloway appreciation

Beatrice Holloway

Beatrice Holloway joined TSL in its early-ish days. Some of her books had already been published but for various reasons, they were unable to re-issue. TSL therefore undertook to re-publish her work. The first books were about the adventures of Rhys, a young lad growing up in Wales. These stories captured much of the experience Beatrice’s husband John had told her about his childood. Since the re-issue of the first three Rhys books, Beatrice has gone on to write a range of other Rhys books – going to high school and more recently getting a girl friend.
Between these, TSL also re-published Beatrice’s Tow Path series – three books about life on a canal or narrow boat. For a good number of years, Beatrice was the official story-teller of the Hertfordshire Narrow Boat Association. She could be found on board most weekends telling historical stories to the young people on board.
As another string to her writing repertoire, Beatrice also has a number of plays published, including a collection for young people.
These all encapsulate Beatrice’s life as a teacher, guiding young people through life using stories and the creative process.
Despite getting on in years, Beatrice has continued to write, expanding her horizons. A non-fiction book on Christmas, the myths, feasts and other aspects of the season being discussed. This short book which has been well-received is an imsightful and informative read. A collection of pieces, short stories and excerpts, some previously published, others not, takes the reader on a writer’s journey – an interesting read, if not enthralling. Most recently, short stories (Duke’s Heartbreak and other stories) and a collection of poetry (The Promise), some of which won awards in local publications. These two publications are Beatrice in top form.
However, it’s her three novels that stand out most for me – they differ widely from each other, take a quirky look at life and stimulate the brain. I fully recommend A Man from the North East, Elusive Destiny and Archie’s Children. Some of the themes in these novels resonate in her scripts (historical – From Commoner to Coronet; family relations – Connie’s Lovely Boy; other worldy – A certain Monday, Governed by Magpies).
Through all these publications, Beatrice has remained a pillar of calm and a source of balanced perspective – not only to me but a number of TSL authors who either were already with TSL or who came to TSL because of her. Long may our relationship continue – I have much still to learn from this remarkable lady – who, by the way, also dabbles with art.

0

Fiction – a platform for challenging topics

Fiction can be a handy tool for tackling issues that are hard-hitting. For example:

Right of Possession (Naomi Young-Rodas) – dealing with an abusive partner.
Archie’s Children (Beatrice Holloway) – a criminal father returns to stay with his adult children.
A little piece for mother (Barbara Towell) – the impact of a holocaust survivor on her daughter growing up in London.
Become the Wind (Alexander Crombie) – dealing with blind people.
So Long Henry Bear (Alexander Crombie) – prisoner of war survivor’s guilt.
The Eye of the Clown (Alexander Crombie) – responses to physical disfigurement.

And if you prefer non-fiction, these might be of interest: