Africa

0

Bhupendra Brahmabhatt

About Bhupendra Brahmabhatt

Bhupendra (1952-2019) grew up in Kenya, East Africa, moving to the United Kingdom during the 1970s. He lived in Pinner, Middlesex and was a member of Harrow Writers’ Circle until it closedin 2019.

Bhupendra wrote for pleasure and pastime, sense of achievement, noting that doing something creative such as writing fiction takes one to another world which can be quite enjoyable.
His advice to aspiring authors is to maybe start with a short story – it can be difficult – but one could refer to personal experiences. Books are important for researching non-fiction and an inspiration for fiction.

Favourite authors include: PG Wodehouse for the humour, AJ Cronin for the poignant storytelling (though often tragic endings), Indian author RK NARAYAN who wrote one of his favourites made into a successful Indian film The Guide, Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim.
His best other reads are Uncle Dynamite by PG Wodehouse, Crusaders Tomb and the Citadel by Cronin.

Of Kenya Days, Moonlit Nights Bhupendra says his favourite bits include the jungle safari chapter, the real Africa, and some of the poetry and song which hopefully will be appreciated by readers.

Books by Bhupendra

Originally posted on 15/05/2018 @ 20:20

0

Book Settings: Africa

What a wonderful list discovery: historical novels of Africa

Africa, the continent, holds a very special place in the TSL fold – not least because both directors were born there. Although heralding from South Africa, they have visited a number of countries on the continent and have a particular affinity for East Africa. So, it’s not surprising that there are books about Africa and books by African Authors in our catalogue.

One of my favourite reads for 2017 was Zukisa Wanner’s London Cape Town Jo’burg whilst another out of the norm read was White Wahala by Ekow Duker.

Originally posted on 23/02/2018 @ 20:20

0

Amna Agib (bit Nafisa)

About Amna Agib (bit Nafisa)

The author is an ordinary woman who has not necessarily suffered in the same way her characters have. However, she tasted a not dissimilar pain. She lived squeezed by the nasty sensation of feeling an outsider. She’s travelled across cities and places and occupied many professions to find herself, yet she didn’t feel she quite belonged to somewhere and in some way.
Writing about people’s suffering may be her destiny and her remedy.

An interview with Amna in November 2018.

Books by Amna

Originally posted on 31/01/2018 @ 20:20