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Through the Nethergate – Roberta Eaton Cheadle

(9 customer reviews)

£12.80 £8.68

Description

ebook

Margaret, a girl born with second sight, has the unique ability to bring ghosts trapped between Heaven and Hell back to life. When her parents die suddenly, she goes to live with her beloved grandfather, but the cellar of her grandfather’s ancient inn is haunted by an evil spirit of its own.
In the town of Bungay, a black dog wanders the streets, enslaving the ghosts of those who have died unnatural deaths. When Margaret arrives, these phantoms congregate at the inn, hoping she can free them from the clutches of Hugh Bigod, the 12th century ghost who has drawn them away from Heaven’s White Light i his canine guise.
With the help of her grandfather and the spirits she has befriened, Margaret sets out to defeat Hugh Bigod, only to discover he wants to use her for his own ends – to take over Hell itself.

About Roberta aka Robbie Cheadle

9 reviews for Through the Nethergate – Roberta Eaton Cheadle

  1. Robbie Cheadle

  2. Robbie Cheadle

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  4. Robbie Cheadle

    Ebook Addicts blog reviewed it here: https://ebookaddicts.net/review-through-the-nethergate/

  5. Robbie Cheadle

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  8. Robbie Cheadle

  9. Frank Parker

    The premise for this book is a clever one. The central protagonist is able to see ghosts. When those ghosts tell their stories readers discover fascinating historical facts. By selecting events in various periods of English history Ms Cheadle is able to bring to light the horrors experienced by ordinary people at the hands of some members of the aristocracy. Her heroine is a sixteen year-old girl who discovers additional powers with which she is able to release these spirits enabling them to enter paradise.
    I will not reveal any more of the plot which is a complex tale of good versus evil. For the most part Ms Cheadle avoids the perils of ‘info-dumping’ as the ghosts of real people tell their personal stories. I can see how this novel will appeal to a youthful readership with many adolescent girls able to visualise themselves in the role of the main character. My fear is that the well intentioned recounting of the struggles behind the social advances we tend to take for granted will be too much of a distraction for some, a touch too preachy, perhaps.
    For me the climactic event, although described in suitably cataclysmic language, lacked either a logical context or the panic I would imagine surrounds a real terrorist attack. Nevertheless, this is a brave attempt to bring history alive for a young readership. I hope it succeeds.

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